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"PAPER CLIPS"
(2004) (Documentary) (G)

Alcohol/
Drugs
Blood/Gore Disrespectful/
Bad Attitude
Frightening/
Tense Scenes
Guns/
Weapons
None None Mild Minor None
Imitative
Behavior
Jump
Scenes
Music
(Scary/Tense)
Music
(Inappropriate)
Profanity
Minor None None None Minor
Sex/
Nudity
Smoking Tense Family
Scenes
Topics To
Talk About
Violence
None Minor Moderate Heavy None


QUICK TAKE:
Documentary: A class of eighth-graders learns about diversity and tolerance for others as they set out to collect one paper clip for each of the millions of victims of the Holocaust.
PLOT:
In Whitwell, Tennessee, the once thriving coal mining town is now an economically depressed municipality with almost no ethnic or religious diversity. As a result, principal Linda Hooper, along with assistant principal David Smith and language arts teacher Sandra Robert decided they needed to teach the 8th grade kids at Whitwell Middle School about diversity and tolerance of others.

The class of 2001 opts to focus on the Holocaust. Needing a way to visual the millions killed, and learning that the Norwegians used the paper clip as their symbol for the horrific event, the kids set out to collect one paper clip for each victim. After a promising start, their effort slows. Yet, when former White House journalists Peter and Dagmar Schroder, along with Washington Post reporter Dita Smith become involved, the kids and their project quickly gain national and then international attention.

Soon, the paper clips are literally pouring in from around the world. From that point on, the kids must deal with the millions of clips that arrive at their school as well as how to use them in what will become a permanent memorial for the Holocaust victims.

WILL KIDS WANT TO SEE IT?
Being a documentary about kids working on a project about the Holocaust, it doesn't seem too likely.
WHY THE MPAA RATED IT: G
For not containing material to warrant a higher rating.
CAST AS ROLE MODELS:
All of those who appear in the film are being themselves, including kids who set out on a worthwhile project, teachers, administrators and others who assist them, and several Holocaust survivors who recount their Holocaust experiences.
CAST, CREW, & TECHNICAL INFO

HOW OTHERS RATED THIS MOVIE


Curious if this title is entertaining, any good, and/or has any artistic merit?
Then read OUR TAKE of this film.


(Note: The "Our Take" review of this title examines the film's artistic merits and does not take into account any of the possibly objectionable material listed below).


OUR WORD TO PARENTS:
The following is a brief summary of the content found in this G-rated documentary. Thematic elements include talk of various forms of prejudice, intolerance and Holocaust survivors recounting their experiences back then (including that of losing family members, some of which might be unsettling for some viewers).

Some people comment about their own past and present prejudice, a few religious-related exclamations are uttered, an eight-grade girl wears a necklace that reads "sexy," and a photo shows a man with a cigarette. Beyond that, the remaining categories have little or nothing in the way of objectionable content.

Nevertheless, if you're still concerned about the film and its appropriateness for yourself or anyone else in your home who may be interested in seeing it, we suggest that you take a closer look at our detailed listings for more specific information regarding the film's content.


ALCOHOL OR DRUG USE
  • None.
  • BLOOD/GORE
  • None.
  • DISRESPECTFUL/BAD ATTITUDE
  • David says he was prejudiced and easy to judge others in the past, but has now changed.
  • Dita Smith states that she had her own prejudice about people living in such areas, especially considering the Scopes trial and KKK of the past appearing nearby.
  • We briefly see footage of hooded KKK members and a burning cross (but there are no other actions, with the bad attitudes implied through one's knowledge of their historical behavior).
  • FRIGHTENING SCENES
  • Some of the tales from Holocaust survivors may be unsettling for some viewers, such as when one recounts his arrival as a young boy at a concentration camp and being separated from his mother and brother. When he asked a guard where they were, the guard pointed to smoke rising from the crematorium smokestack (he says he didn't realize then what that meant, but it chokes him up as he recalls it).
  • GUNS/WEAPONS
  • None.
  • IMITATIVE BEHAVIOR
  • A high school girl wears a necklace that says "sexy."
  • JUMP SCENES
  • None.
  • MUSIC (SCARY/TENSE)
  • None.
  • MUSIC (INAPPROPRIATE)
  • None.
  • PROFANITY
  • At least 2 uses of "My God" and 1 use of "Oh my God."
  • SEX/NUDITY
  • None.
  • SMOKING
  • We see a photo of a man holding a cigarette.
  • TENSE FAMILY SCENES
  • A woman who lost 14 family members in the Holocaust comments about that and growing up with no grandparents.
  • A Holocaust survivor recounts his arrival as a young boy at a concentration camp and being separated from his mother and brother. When he asked a guard where they were, the guard pointed to smoke rising from the crematorium smokestack (he says he didn't realize then what that meant, but it chokes him up as he recalls it).
  • TOPICS TO TALK ABOUT
  • The Holocaust.
  • Diversity.
  • Unchecked prejudice.
  • David says he was prejudiced and easy to judge others in the past. However, he states that he doesn't want his kids to grow up with racist thoughts like he did from his father.
  • Dita Smith states that she had her own prejudice about people living in such areas, especially considering the Scopes trial and KKK of the past appearing nearby.
  • We briefly see footage of hooded KKK members and a burning cross.
  • There's brief mention of the Scopes trial (regarding evolution, etc.).
  • Anne Frank.
  • How people judge and look down upon others, especially based on where they live, such as the South.
  • A Holocaust survivor recounts his arrival as a young boy at a concentration camp and being separated from his mother and brother. When he asked a guard where they were, the guard pointed to smoke rising from the crematorium smokestack (he says he didn't realize then what that meant, but it chokes him up as he recalls it).
  • There's brief mention of people who don't believe the Holocaust occurred.
  • An onscreen title shows the date being Sept 11, 2001 when a German cattle car is being transported to the Tennessee school.
  • The use of symbols for informative and healing purposes.
  • A WWII Allied rescuer recounts meeting an emaciated concentration camp survivor, only to learn that she died just moments later.
  • VIOLENCE
  • None.



  • Reviewed August 10, 2004 / Posted December 3, 2004

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